Do foreign stock investors pay US taxes?

As a general rule, foreign investors (i.e. non-U.S. citizens and residents) with no U.S. business are typically not obligated to file a U.S. tax return, including on income generated from U.S. capital gains on U.S. securities trades.

Do foreigners pay taxes on U.S. stocks?

Nonresident aliens are subject to no U.S. capital gains tax, but capital gains taxes will likely be paid in your country of origin. Nonresident aliens are subject to a dividend tax rate of 30% on dividends paid out by U.S. companies.

Do foreign investors pay tax on dividends?

Dividends received from foreign companies are not taxable in the US. Capital gains from the sale of stocks and short-term capital gain distributions will not trigger any US tax liability. However, you will likely have to declare this income and pay tax in your home country.

Do stock investors pay taxes?

Normally, investment income includes interest and dividends. The income you receive from interest and unqualified dividends are generally taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. Certain dividends, on the other hand, can receive special tax treatment, which are usually taxed at lower long-term capital gains tax rates.

Can a foreigner buy US stocks?

There is no citizenship requirement for owning stocks of American companies. While U.S. investment securities are regulated by U.S. law, there are no specific provisions that forbid individuals who are not citizens of the U.S. from participating in the U.S. stock market.

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How are foreign dividends taxed in the US?

Typically your foreign dividends will be clipped for an income tax withheld in the issuer’s home country. The going rate is 15%, although there are variations up and down from that point. The good news is that you can get much of that money back—on occasion, all of it—when you file your U.S. return.